Tulare County Bail Schedule

201502.09

Individuals recently arrested in Tulare County, California could be subject to the bail schedule published by the Tulare County Superior Court. Once an individual is charged with a crime, a person can refer to the bail schedule if officials deem them eligible to leave prison on bail until the beginning of an official trial.

What is a Bail Schedule?

A bail schedule is a written document stating the set bail amounts for specific crimes. In some cases, a person, their family, or their friends can easily gather the amount of money needed to post bail. When, however, the bail is too high or the arrested individual has limited financial resources, the services of a bail bond company may be used. In addition to helping post bail, a bail bond company may be able to work with officials to greatly reduce the bail amount.

Specific Bail Amounts

Tulare County’s bail schedule is divided into two categories: the misdemeanor bail schedule and the felony bail schedule. Obviously, the misdemeanor bail schedule includes the set bail amounts for misdemeanors, while the felony bail schedule includes the set bail amounts for felonies. In general, bail amounts rise with the severity of a crime.

Some misdemeanors included in the Tulare County bail schedule are: false identification to a police officer, assault on a school employee, prowling, stalking, and child molesting. Bail amounts for listed misdemeanors start at $5,000 and go up to about $35,000. If an individual is charged with an unlisted misdemeanor, default bail is set at $2,500.

Some felonies included in the Tulare County bail schedule are: falsifying a jury list, manufacturing false identity documents, threatening an elected official or judge, and assaulting a police officer. As felonies are generally considered more serious than misdemeanors, the bail amounts in this section of the schedule tend to be higher. Bail amounts for most of the felonies listed range from $5000 to $250,000. A person arrested for attempting to commit a certain crime could be forced to pay the bail amount listed for the actual crime, even if the action was not completed.

These amounts exclude the bail requirements for serious felonies. For example, an individual who is charged with either first or second-degree murder is considered ineligible for bail. In this case, a person must stay in prison while awaiting trial.

For other serious crimes, a person is allowed to post bail, but is unlikely to be able to afford the bail amount. Crimes in this category include kidnapping or the transportation of certain illegal drugs. The bail for these crimes is set at $1,000,000. If a person is charged with trafficking extremely large amounts of illegal drugs, they can face a bail of $3,000,000. If unable to post bail, the person must stay in prison while awaiting trial.